2021 discount If You lowest Can Keep It: The Forgotten new arrival Promise of American Liberty outlet online sale

2021 discount If You lowest Can Keep It: The Forgotten new arrival Promise of American Liberty outlet online sale

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#1 New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas delivers an extraordinary book that is part history and part rousing call to arms, steeped in a critical analysis of our founding fathers'' original intentions for America. 

In 1787, when the Constitution was drafted, a woman asked Ben Franklin what the founders had given the American people. "A republic," he shot back, "if you can keep it." More than two centuries later, Metaxas examines what that means and how we are doing on that score.

If You Can Keep It is at once a thrilling review of America''s uniqueness—including our role as a "nation of nations"—and a chilling reminder that America''s greatness cannot continue unless we embrace our own crucial role in living out what the founders entrusted to us. Metaxas explains that America is not a nation bounded by ethnic identity or geography, but rather by a radical and unprecedented idea, based on liberty and freedom for all. He cautions us that it''s nearly past time we reconnect to that idea, or we may lose the very foundation of what made us exceptional in the first place.

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Praise for If You Can Keep It

"Profound and thoroughly entertaining . . . This book has made me think in ways that I haven’t in years. Metaxas is a major writer. Not to be missed."  —Dick Cavett

"If You Can Keep It: The Forgotten Promise of American Liberty—along with such essentials as Up from Slavery by Booker T. Washington and The 5000 Year Leap by W. Cleon Skousen—must be front and center on every reading list." The Washington Times

"Everyone in every country, at every socioeconomic level, of every religious and secular persuasion, of every political bent, should read it. . . . It’s the book you must read this year." — Martha Rogers, PhD, coauthor of Extreme Trust: Honesty as a Competitive Advantage
 
"Eric Metaxas [is] one of our nation’s most brilliant and morally serious public intellectuals."  —Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University
 
"Irresistible . . . compellingly written . . . important. Not only should every American read it—they should then reread it aloud to their children and grandchildren."  —Dennis Prager
 
"Eric Metaxas has done a great service to the country."  —Gregory Alan Thornbury, PhD, president of the King’s College, New York City

"A faith-based argument for American exceptionalism . . . that will appeal to Christian readers." — Kirkus Reviews

Praise for Miracles


Miracles is the sort of book that—once you''ve read it—you''ll wonder where it''s been all your life.” — Kathie Lee Gifford, Emmy Award—winning host,  The Today Show 

“If you’re a skeptic, read this book with an open mind and you might just discover that miracles are real. If you’re already a believer, be ready to be inspired.”  —Kirsten Powers, columnist for USA Today and The Daily Beast

“Take the brilliant mind of Eric Metaxas, add the provocative topic of miracles, and get ready to change the way you see reality forever.”  —Erwin Raphael McManus, founder of MOSAIC and author of  The Artisan Soul: Crafting Your Life into a Work of Art 

“Metaxas has done it again. . . . He presents hope for the tone deaf who cannot hear the splendor of the music of the spheres, and he brings in sunlight for modern cave dwellers who have become accustomed to only shadows on the wall of our increasingly windowless world.”  —Os Guinness, author of Long Journey Home

“The miracles in Miracles—and Eric''s own amazing miraculous experience—bring out the fact that the miraculous gift of eternal life that God provides can be experienced here on earth.”  —Luis Palau, international evangelist 
 
Praise for Bonhoeffer

“Eric Metaxas tells Bonhoeffer''s story with passion and theological sophistication.”  The Wall Street Journal

“A captivating and inspiring read from start to finish . . . Buy it. This book could change your life.”  —James N. Lane, founder of the New Canaan Society and former general partner, Goldman, Sachs & Co.

“Eric Metaxas has written the kind of extraordinary book that not only brings Dietrich Bonhoeffer, his times and his witness vividly alive, but also leaves us yearning to find the same moral character in ourselves.  No biographer can achieve anything higher. Archbishop Charles Chaput
 
“Metaxas’ Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy is a modern-day classic that should be on ‘best of’ lists for the decade.” —Relevant Magazine
 

“[A]n electrifying account of one man’s stand against tyranny.”  —Human Events

About the Author

Eric Metaxas is the #1  New York Times bestselling author of  Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy;  Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery;  and  Miracles. His books have been translated into more than twenty languages. His writing has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The New Yorker, and Metaxas has appeared as a cultural commentator on CNN, the Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. He is the host of The Eric Metaxas Show, a nationally syndicated daily radio show. Metaxas is also the founder and host of Socrates in the City, the acclaimed series of conversations on "life, God, and other small topics," featuring Malcolm Gladwell, Dr. Francis Collins, and N.T. Wright, among many others. He is a senior fellow and lecturer at large at the King''s College in New York City, where he lives with his wife and daughter.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Doug Hibbard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good kind of political
Reviewed in the United States on June 17, 2016
I cannot help but think many will dismiss Metaxas'' latest as a simple political tome. After all, he''s fairly well pigeon-holed on the "conservative" side of the fence in modern life. However, this is more of a historical review than a candidate advocacy book.... See more
I cannot help but think many will dismiss Metaxas'' latest as a simple political tome. After all, he''s fairly well pigeon-holed on the "conservative" side of the fence in modern life. However, this is more of a historical review than a candidate advocacy book.

First of all, Metaxas reviews the founding of the United States. Obviously, for the sake of time, he simplifies some of the history but does not take excessive liberty. I do think that some debate is valid over the religious views of the Founding Fathers (Jefferson, especially) but Metaxas is right that they were all convinced of the need for a morality based outside of human preference for self-governance.

Second, the charge here is clear: liberty is the heritage of America but we are foolishly giving it away. He identifies both liberal and conservative errors that are confounding our heritage.

In all, a good challenging read. May it inform not only votes but our approach to a republic and liberty as a whole.
219 people found this helpful
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Mountain Dancer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Book For Such a Time As This.
Reviewed in the United States on August 5, 2016
History is being re-written. Rather that looking at what this country accomplished in the light of the 17th and 18th centuries, it is being judged by today''s social justice. Our cynical society looks past the good, the honorable, and the true in a concerted effort to... See more
History is being re-written. Rather that looking at what this country accomplished in the light of the 17th and 18th centuries, it is being judged by today''s social justice. Our cynical society looks past the good, the honorable, and the true in a concerted effort to "find the dirt" on our founding fathers. Teachers love to point out that Jefferson and Washington were slave owners -- and when viewed in the light of today''s understanding, this builds impenetrable emotional barriers that prevents students from even considering these men as heroes who dedicated their lives to the creation of the most exceptional experiment in political history; the idea that people could govern themselves.

Eric Metaxas reopens the doors to examine the people who helped to found our country and he challenges us to, instead, examine the good, the moral, and the heroic -- both then and now. Eric is a prolific storyteller that weaves connections between the visions of our forefathers and how we, as a county, continue to be looked upon by the rest of world as the ones who always will come to the rescue.

I teach history. I found myself cheering at finding new material to present to my students and creative ways to help them examine the honorable in who we were and who continue to be. Media sources of all sorts bombard our kids with messages of what selfish xenophobes Americans are. In the chapter Venerating Our Heroes, Eric states that one of the very reasons he wrote this book was that "...by ceasing to tell these mythic and heroic stories of our history, we had in fact lost touch with ourselves..." He continues, "We are more than political ideas. We are a people who live those ideas out in common." I began to create curriculum that encourages my students to research and write some of those very stories: Lessons from American Heroes.

Another thoughtful application from the chapter The Idea of America, is to have students research some of the benevolent organizations founded here in America and how they are reaching around the world to bring aid and comfort. I will ask the question, how have we, as a nation, promoted that which is charitable?

Finally, Eric challenges us to look at the morality of our leaders. This is where I can freely admit to being extremely cynical over my lifetime — one that has been filled with leaders whose grab for greed and power has only been equalled by their sexual improprieties. Never was there a more important plea than his call for "leaders who themselves love the country and the freedoms of this country more than they love themselves and their own career or reputations or ''legacies''." (p. 153)

As we continue our self examination of who "we the people" really are in the light of the of ever-present violence and hate that permeates this world, If You Can Keep It offers a reassuring hope that we so desperately need at this time.
84 people found this helpful
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Lancia E. Smith
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Most important book to read this summer!
Reviewed in the United States on June 17, 2016
I have not read anything in the past couple of decades that has stirred in me so much a sense of the fragile and awesome responsibility of what it means to be American. This is a book written to reach the hearts of Americans who love America but whose memory of our precious... See more
I have not read anything in the past couple of decades that has stirred in me so much a sense of the fragile and awesome responsibility of what it means to be American. This is a book written to reach the hearts of Americans who love America but whose memory of our precious identity has been covered with tarnish. Citations for the many references would have earned this title a 5 star review, but even without them, I can say this is very likely the most important book you can read this year. What Eric Metaxas does well, he does better than just about anyone. He stirs memory, longing, and calling while shining a light forward. Few books you read this year will give you a greater sense of hope or accountability! Buy it, read it, and give copies to your loved ones! Who of us does not need to remember how precious a gift and responsibility we have to uphold America?
172 people found this helpful
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Steve Bell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A republic, madam – if you can keep it.
Reviewed in the United States on November 27, 2016
I think back to President Obama, early in his first term, making the statement that, of course Americans think their country is exceptional just as the Greeks think their country is exceptional; and the British, and the Chinese, etc. That’s paraphrasing, but I’m sure most... See more
I think back to President Obama, early in his first term, making the statement that, of course Americans think their country is exceptional just as the Greeks think their country is exceptional; and the British, and the Chinese, etc. That’s paraphrasing, but I’m sure most readers will remember that. So, it isn’t surprising that when the chief magistrate of the U. S. doesn’t understand what American exceptionalism means, vast numbers of ordinary citizens, especially the younger ones, don’t either. What it means is that the United States was the only country in history that purposely set out to create a government that was by, for and of the people. It laid the foundation of a free society that could prosper in its freedom and where the government governed by the consent of the people.
The title comes from the story of Benjamin Franklin leaving the Constitutional Convention on its last day. A Philadelphia woman stopped him and asked, “Well, Doctor, what have we got? A republic or a monarchy.” To which Franklin replied, “A republic, madam – if you can keep it.”
Eric Metaxas’ work is exceptional. He delves deep into American roots to find what made Americans, as a society, able to create and live within a free republic . . . and keep it. The “keeping it” part is now the challenge as we see Doctor Franklin’s admonition becoming reality. The author makes some profound observations and suggests there is a way back, if we only take it.
I recommend this book to all audiences, but especially the youth and young adults who are unaware of much that has transpired in the founding and history of our nation and some of the key individuals responsible for leadership at critical times; some who are well known, like George Washington, and others not so well known in our age, like George Whitefield.
63 people found this helpful
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mom and teacher of 4
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This must be read, even to the kids
Reviewed in the United States on March 13, 2017
My father read it first. Then he passed it to me with the admonition that "this must be read, even to the kids". We are reading it aloud at our house - my 7 year old is fascinated, my 12 and 13 yr olds are both encouraged and on alert as they contrast the ideals... See more
My father read it first. Then he passed it to me with the admonition that "this must be read, even to the kids". We are reading it aloud at our house - my 7 year old is fascinated, my 12 and 13 yr olds are both encouraged and on alert as they contrast the ideals identified with the current events on our news today. So thankful for this book. Timely. Well-researched. Very worth my time.
35 people found this helpful
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William J. Bahr
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Preaching Patriotism
Reviewed in the United States on April 26, 2018
This is a very well-written book to the extent that it is an easy read, with plenty of poetic phraseology and interesting characterizations. I read it to update my own book “George Washington’s Liberty Key.” While I didn’t find anything really new about George Washington,... See more
This is a very well-written book to the extent that it is an easy read, with plenty of poetic phraseology and interesting characterizations. I read it to update my own book “George Washington’s Liberty Key.” While I didn’t find anything really new about George Washington, I didn’t see any obvious errors about him or anyone else mentioned in the book, with the exception of Metaxas’ insistence that Parson Weems wrote that the six-year-old Washington “chopped down” the cherry tree. Actually, Washington was said to have “barked” it, ie cut the bark enough to seriously interrupt the sap flow so that the tree would eventually die. As well, along with a number of eminent historians, I disagree with Metaxas’ “arguable” assertion that Lincoln was a greater president than Washington. I did notice that much of the book is spent discussing and supporting Os Guinness’ “Golden Triangle of Freedom” (Freedom requires Virtue; Virtue requires Faith; Faith requires Freedom.” My own book’s assessment (from studying Washington’s and Lafayette’s words) is that the “Key to Liberty” is found in the triad of “Character (unwritten rules of virtuous behavior), Culture (national character), and Constitution (written rules).” I think I tend to agree with Metaxas that many of the pragmatic Founders (to include Washington) believed that enlightened morality was not enough to keep the average American virtuous and on the straight and narrow, that the average person needs religion, by which is probably meant a God-fearing (eternal punishment) belief system. Metaxas is quite clear in asserting that a Judeo-Christian belief system is what is called for. On the other hand, the reader is left to wonder as to whether all Judeo-Christian religions qualify as adequate and how close other religions, even those that might be antithetical to American values, might come to fulfilling the Golden Triangle’s faith requirement. All in all, the book is essentially a timely, interesting exhortation to “keep the Republic,” with a number of the author’s examples of how to do so: some of which are faith, tolerance, ritual, hero worship, dedication to patriotic art, etc.

Check out one of William J. Bahr’s books: George Washington''s Liberty Key: Mount Vernon''s Bastille Key – the Mystery and Magic of Its Body, Mind, and Soul , a best seller at Mount Vernon.
13 people found this helpful
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KarenLeePA
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m always amazed at how much I wasn''t taught in school
Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2019
Of course to teach at this depth wouldn''t have been possible in school, but there are many bits of information that were new to me I thought should have been taught. I love how he covers ''the times''. So often we view history from today''s perspective, Metaxas''... See more
Of course to teach at this depth wouldn''t have been possible in school, but there are many bits of information that were new to me I thought should have been taught.

I love how he covers ''the times''. So often we view history from today''s perspective, Metaxas'' greatest skill is to reset your view of the times by building a picture one story at a time. I listen to books when I have long drives or rides and Metaxas'' style lends itself well to listening, not all historical writings do. I highly recommend reading Amazing Grace after this one to expand your view of the world at the time the United States was created.
6 people found this helpful
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Josh Morgan
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great aim, weak support.
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2017
I love his passion and writing skills. I just wish he would have done more scholarly research. Overall, it''s not his thesis that I question. It is some of his supporting details of main points that I have an issue about. Folks who I think do a better... See more
I love his passion and writing skills. I just wish he would have done more scholarly research.

Overall, it''s not his thesis that I question. It is some of his supporting details of main points that I have an issue about.

Folks who I think do a better job with main arguments and supporting detail are Deirdre N. McCloskey The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce and Joel Mokyr A Culture of Growth: The Origins of the Modern Economy (Graz Schumpeter Lectures) . Among others.
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Two Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 18, 2017
So much potential but ruined by being reductive to the point of trite.
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Randy A. Stadt
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
America the Beautiful (Not the Perfect, Nor the Irredeemable)
Reviewed in Canada on August 15, 2021
This is an important book; in fact I would go so far to say that this is the best and most important book I have read this year. I would encourage all Americans to read this, and even for American parents to get their high-school-age children to read it. It’s actually...See more
This is an important book; in fact I would go so far to say that this is the best and most important book I have read this year. I would encourage all Americans to read this, and even for American parents to get their high-school-age children to read it. It’s actually remarkably easy reading, and I will be reading it again very soon. “If You Can Keep It,” is sub-titled “The Forgotten Promise of American Liberty,” and it gets its title from an encounter at the close of the American Constitutional Convention in 1787, when Benjamin Franklin emerged from the arduous but yet successful negotiations to be confronted by a woman who asked him what kind of government they were getting – a monarchy or a republic? “A republic, madam, if you can keep it,” was the reply. His words carried both satisfaction and warning. And the bulk of this book is unpacking the reasons for both of these sentiments. We are so used to hearing that America is a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people” that the words don’t resonate the way they did at the Founding of the nation. The idea that people would actually govern themselves, and not be governed by others, was entirely new on the stage of history. Even ancient Greece, which introduced the idea of democracy, was not a true forebear of this experiment because those governments did not extend beyond the level of city-states, and by being sheer democracies could not guarantee liberty and justice for all, but only for the majority. The magnitude of Benjamin Franklin’s concern that from the outset, American liberty hung in the balance and could so easily be lost is far from obvious to us, as it was to Metaxas himself, until he learned as an adult the concept that was common currency at the time of the Founding, but in our day has all but disappeared from our conceptual frameworks and thus from our classrooms. This is the concept of “The Golden Triangle of Freedom, which goes like this: Freedom requires Virtue, Virtue requires Religion, and Religion requires Freedom.” You have a triangle with all three sides requiring the others to be sustained. If any one of them is lost or compromised, none of them can be sustained. Lest we think that this is nonsense, since we have freedom but have without harm jettisoned virtue and religion from the public square, we need to be reminded that freedom as understood by the Founders, is not licence. It is not the ability to do whatever you want, but the ability to do what you ought. If America really does require this “Golden Triangle of Freedom,” and if Freedom, Virtue, and Religion are nowhere to be found in contemporary culture, at least in the public square, then Metaxas is right to sound the alarm that America is in trouble. He reminds us that America and the ideals it embodies are not just for the benefit of Americans, but are for the benefit of the world. And so if they are lost, and America fundamentally changes into something unrecognizable to the Founders, everybody loses. It has become fashionable in the last fifty or so years to become critical of America while portraying patriotism as unsophisticated jingoism. But acknowledgement of America’s shortcomings, Metaxas argues, does not require viewing the country as irredeemable. And love of country need not, and indeed ought not, be uncritical. To love the good in someone encourages the object of that love to strive to be better. And to love the good in America encourages her to repent of her sins and strive harder to live up to her founding ideals. In America we have a republic if we can keep it. It is worth preserving, correcting, loving, and nurturing. It’s future hangs in the balance but Metaxas exudes the confidence that one by one, her citizens can recover the vision of Washington, Franklin, and the other Founders who left such a treasure as a trust to future generations.
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Jessica in Ontario, Canada
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A breath of fresh air
Reviewed in Canada on November 5, 2020
This book opened my eyes to America’s true history and her founding and why it truly is the greatest country in the world. This book should be required reading for all high school students everywhere!!
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Brett Seib
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Must read
Reviewed in Australia on December 6, 2020
Brilliant! Must Read
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in Canada on June 20, 2017
Everyone concerned about a free and democratic society needs to read this.
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2021 discount If You lowest Can Keep It: The Forgotten new arrival Promise of American Liberty outlet online sale

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